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Louth Museum

Lectures and Outings

THIS YEAR'S PROGRAMME

Louth Naturalists’, Antiquarian and Literary Society’s (“LNALS”) lectures take place in the ConocoPhillips Room of Louth Library which is situated between Eastgate and Northgate. The ConocoPhillips Room is on the first floor of Louth Library and has full wheelchair access. Entry to our lectures for LNALS members costs £1.00 and non-members are most welcome, with an entry fee of £4.00 per person per lecture, payable on the night. Booking forms for our summer outings will be available from Louth Museum.

Guided visit to Epworth, the Mechanics’ Institute and the Old Rectory
CANCELLED

Wednesday, 15th July 2020 8:23am

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Guided visit to Epworth, the Mechanics’ Institute and the Old Rectory

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The Crafters of Kingship: Smithcraft, Gender and Elite Power in Early Mediaeval Europe

Tuesday, 22nd September 2020 7:30pm

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The Crafters of Kingship: Smithcraft, Gender and Elite Power in Early Mediaeval Europe

Duncan is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at Bishop Grosseteste University, specialising in interdisciplinary studies of settlement, landscape and conflict. His work typically integrates documentary and topographic sources with archaeological evidence to reconstruct the evolution of sites and landscapes during the medieval period in particular. Duncan’s early medieval interests focus on the development of kingship, and the changing role of metalworkers detectable through the study of elite settlement complexes.

After studying an MA in Medieval Archaeology at the University of York, Duncan worked as a Heritage Consultant for Wessex Archaeology before undertaking a doctorate at the University of Exeter. Following completion of his PhD, he worked on the University of Exeter research project Anarchy? War and Status in Twelfth-century Landscapes of Conflict.

In the earliest medieval centuries, skilled metalsmiths were of great value to leaders who required impressive metalwork to maintain social links and the loyalty of their retainers. In spite of their clear importance to elite society, smiths are regularly depicted by contemporary sources as marginal characters, in what seems to represent an attempt to limit the extent of their influence. Strategies of exclusion saw artisans live and die on the fringes of high-status landscapes, but archaeological and documentary evidence demonstrate that they were also perceived as embodying a distinct gender. Such characteristics have numerous anthropological parallels but bear closest resemblance to the two-spirit people of native North American communities; individuals who were honoured for their crafting skills but also acted as curators of liminality, spiritual figureheads who directed rituals integral to the reproduction of society. Using the documented phenomena of the two-spirit as an interpretive framework, it is argued that leading smiths in early medieval societies likewise acted as sacerdo, orchestrating symbolic cycles of creation and destruction. Ultimately, the emerging forms of rulership which accompanied the growing establishment of the Church saw the symbolic potency and economic primacy of smithcraft wane, although notable continuities in the practice and status of leading metalworkers is discernible over the course of the Christian conversion.

A Tudor Page-turner: St James’ Churchwardens’ Accounts 1527-1570

Tuesday, 29th September 2020 7:30pm

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A Tudor Page-turner: St James’ Churchwardens’ Accounts 1527-1570

Brian was for many years a bus and coach driver in Nottingham. He “retired” in 1995 and started courses at the Nottingham WEA, mostly in history. Having been encouraged to take the Certificate in Archaeology in the School of Continuing Education at the University of Nottingham, he went on to complete a BA (Hons), MA in Local History and finally a PhD on the dissolution of the monasteries in Lincolnshire. During his research he came across the Louth Churchwardens’ Accounts. Having given a talk for the Lincoln Record Society, Nicholas Bennett suggested he transcribe the second book of accounts, the result of which awaits publication.

The Louth Churchwarden’s Accounts are some of the county’s most comprehensive surviving parish documents, continuing in an almost unbroken sequence from the beginning of the 16th century until the present day. These documents open a panorama on the undertakings of a large, wealthy parish church and its interactions with the local community during the period of the Reformation. This talk will illustrate small examples of the vast number of entries that together bring an understanding of the trials and tribulations of a market town during this period of unrest, both political and religious.

Tastes of Lincolnshire

Tuesday, 6th October 2020 8:25am

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Tastes of Lincolnshire

Details to follow.

The Archaeology of the Triton Knoll Power Line through Lincolnshire

Tuesday, 13th October 2020 8:26am

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The Archaeology of the Triton Knoll Power Line through Lincolnshire

Details to follow.

WALLIS LECTURE: Lincolnshire’s Angelic Host: The Wonderful World of Mediaeval Roof Angels

Tuesday, 20th October 2020 8:27am

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WALLIS LECTURE: Lincolnshire’s Angelic Host: The Wonderful World of Mediaeval Roof Angels

Geoff was one of the founder members of the Spirit of Sutterby Project which has been running now for seven years. The project is based on the tiny church and Deserted Mediaeval Village of Sutterby in the Lincolnshire Wolds. It is a community heritage project with members pursuing a wide range of research interests.

From this and a passion and love of churches in all their aspects, was born this particular project undertaking new research into mediaeval roof angels in Lincolnshire.

New Archaeological Discoveries: Finds and Sites in the Louth Area and Wider County

Tuesday, 27th October 2020 8:27am

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New Archaeological Discoveries: Finds and Sites in the Louth Area and Wider County

Details to follow.

Flinders’ Discoveries & Flinders Discovered

Tuesday, 3rd November 2020 8:28am

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Flinders’ Discoveries & Flinders Discovered

Alan is a retired teacher, formerly Head of Department at Cowley’s School, Donington. On retirement, he took over the church display on Flinders, enlarging it to its present size. He looks forward to being able to make it more professional in the likely event of funding becoming available.

The talk will begin with the early life of Flinders and a brief resumee of his first two voyages to the Southern Ocean as Midshipman/Lieutenant. Emphasis will be on his third journey as Commander of HMS Investigator: his marriage prior to sailing, the findings of the voyage and subsequent travels before captivity on Isle de France (Mauritius). It will cover his eventual return to Britain, his poor health and early death in parallel with the successful outcomes of the voyage.

The talk will then explain the various attempts to bring his achievements to the fore, successful in Australia, but not so in Britain. The 2019 discovery of the mortal remains of Captain Flinders near Euston Station is the breakthrough for Britain with publicity never envisaged. The final part of the story is yet to be written with his re-burial in Donington in 2020.

RAF Stenigot – a Pioneering Radar Station

Tuesday, 10th November 2020 8:28am

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RAF Stenigot – a Pioneering Radar Station

Chris is a retired engineer with an interest in Lincolnshire’s industrial archaeology and the history of technology.

RAF Stenigot formed part of the WWII “Chain Home” radar system – the world’s first integrated air defence radar system, many of whose principles are still applicable today. In the 1990s it was the most complete survivor of the original 20 stations, when the decision was made to demolish most of the buildings. This illustrated lecture results from survey and research work carried out by the Society for Lincolnshire History and Archaeology working with English Heritage to record the buildings and uncover their story. It starts with the background to Chain Home, describes the site and its equipment, the people who worked there and the auxiliary activities. It also covers the Cold War period when the site was part of the “Ace High” NATO communications system.

The Voyage of The Beagle

Tuesday, 17th November 2020 8:29am

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The Voyage of The Beagle

Peter is a native of Grimsby, leaving Winteringham Grammar School initially for University College of North Staffordshire - University of Keele - to read for a double honours degree in Geography and Geology. Thereafter he studied at the University of Manchester (PhD in 1967). Although in 1980s he was Chair of Physical Geography at the University of Nottingham, it was the University of Reading that furnished both his first job and a longer-term post as Professor of Quaternary Geology, and where he was conferred as Professor Emeritus in 2000. He has published over 150 research papers and his first book on the Lincolnshire land holdings of the Darwin family.

Charles Darwin spent just over five years voyaging around the world in a counter-clockwise direction between 1831 and 1836. However, for most of the time he was ashore exploring on horseback the landscapes inland from various anchorages. The vast bulk of his observations concerned the local geology and not as popularly believed biology. The speaker has visited many of the landfall locations and will describe a selection of these. Reference will be made to the publications which resulted from the voyage and assess their significance.

Plough Monday, its Customs and Traditions in Lincolnshire and Beyond

Tuesday, 24th November 2020 8:29am

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Plough Monday, its Customs and Traditions in Lincolnshire and Beyond

Born in Northampton, Ruairidh Greig grew up and was educated in Grimsby, Lincolnshire. Inspired by the folk revival of the 1960s, he began to explore his Scottish family traditions and those from his local area in Lincolnshire. His initial interest in song soon extended to most aspects of folk life and folklore. Whilst training to be a teacher, in Sheffield, he became involved with the University Survey of Language and Folklore as a volunteer collector.

After qualifying, he completed a postgraduate Master of Philosophy degree on Seasonal House-Visiting Customs in South Yorkshire. Returning to Lincolnshire in 1979, he has continued to research local customs and traditions, especially the Plough Play.Plough Monday has long been celebrated in Lincolnshire, marking the start of the agricultural cycle in the New Year.

The talk charts the records of the earliest references in church records to reports of related customs in general and to the Plough Play in particular. First reported in the eighteenth century, this local version of the mummers’ play combines elements from various sources, including folk song, stage drama and chapbooks. These will be examined in more detail with regard to music, language and humour as well as noting the response of the community.